Nichelle Nichols, Lieutenant Uhura on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 89

Actress Nichelle Nichols, known for her most famous role as communications officer Lieutenant Uhura aboard the USS Enterprise in the popular Star Trek television series

Trailblazing actress Nichelle Nichols, who played communications officer Nyota Uhura with cool authority on the popular 1960s series “Star Trek,” has died at 89.

Her son, Kyle Johnson, announced the death on the official uhura.com website, saying, “Last night, my mother, Nichelle Nichols, succumbed to natural causes and passed away. Her light, however, like the ancient galaxies now being seen for the first time, will remain.”

“Hers was a life well lived and as such a model for us all,” said Johnson. “I, and the rest of our family, would appreciate your patience and forbearance as we grieve her loss until we can recover sufficiently to speak further. Her services will be for family members and the closest of her friends and we request that her and our privacy be respected.”

Johnson signed the message, “Live Long and Prosper.”

Nichols died in Silver City, New Mexico, where she had been living with her son.

Tributes poured in quickly, including from a long list of devoted “Trekkies.”

William Shatner, who played the USS Enterprise’s Captain James T. Kirk and shared one of the first interracial kisses on television with Nichols, sent his condolences to her family.

“She was a beautiful woman & played an admirable character that did so much for redefining social issues both here in the US & throughout the world. I will certainly miss her.”

George Takei, who as helmsman Sulu shared the bridge with Lieutenant Uhura, called her “trailblazing and incomparable.”

Georgia politician and diehard “Trek” fan Stacey Abrams shared a photograph of her and Nichols, hailing the star as a “champion, warrior and tremendous actor.”

And U.S. President Joe Biden said Nichols “redefined what is possible for Black Americans and women.”

“Our nation is forever indebted to inspiring artists like Nichelle Nichols, who show us a future where unity, dignity, and respect are cornerstones of every society,” he said in a statement.

Nichols made history with one of the first interracial kisses on U.S. television – a 1968 embrace shared with Shatner (a kiss deemed worthy of a separate entry in Wikipedia).

Martin Luther King Jr. himself once praised Nichols, who broke ground with her powerful performance at a time when Black actors more often were cast as servants or criminals.

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